Stopping lone calls

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Dlan
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Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:08 pm
Location: Ohio

Stopping lone calls

Unread post by Dlan » Sat Sep 10, 2022 8:46 pm

Front time to time I've talked about stopping lone calls on this site.
All too often I see a team holding both holding the same suit for the last card. This should almost never happen.
Even worst is when the lone could have been stopped but the partner chose to save the wrong ace.

While you can't stop all, here are a couple of things you can do to increase your chances.

Frist lead plays a major role here. Give your partner as much information as you legally can.

First, don't lead that single ace. If it is the stopper, it will still be at the end. Think about what that does to your partner.

Now if you have two aces then lead one. This will tell your partner you still have another ace.

Second, show your partner the suit you can not stop by playing that suit the first time you can't follow the suit led by the lone-maker.

Third, Hold your double suit till the end. This way your partner knows what suit your holding for the last trick.

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https://worldofcardgames.com/#!replayer ... %3A1%7D%5D

Image

https://worldofcardgames.com/#!replayer ... %3A1%7D%5D



Richardb02
Posts: 745
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2018 8:57 pm
Location: Florida

Unread post by Richardb02 » Sat Sep 17, 2022 7:39 pm

Great post. It corrects my near knee jerk response to lead Next to an Alone.

"First, don't lead that single ace. If it is the stopper, it will still be at the end. Think about what that does to your partner." This guidance trumps the advantage of leading Next to an Alone! Give your partner a chance (to take the trick, which worked perfectly in the 2nd hand), is another principle in action.

"Second, show your partner the suit you can not stop by playing that suit the first time you can't follow the suit led by the lone-maker." This fits perfectly in both hands displayed. The Jc is the best choice in both hands.

"Third, Hold your double suit till the end. This way your partner knows what suit your holding for the last trick." This is illustrated excellently in both hands. Making the proper lead, leaves you with 2 Doubletons. Partner's play (legally communicating which suit he will not be covering) will direct which of your Doubletons to keep.

Did I miss or misstate anything?

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