Comments of general interest - Rules page
Section 3



Great site. We had a tournament at the house the other night, and as usual my brother-in-law questioned everything. By studying your site and having your set of rules printed out, I was able to shut his mouth and we had a wonderful time!


At a family get together the opponent picked the right bower. In jest I said I would bet him x$ that he would take at least trick. His son recommended he take the bet then renege in play and that way the hand is over and I would lose the bet because he would lose the bid. I agreed he would lose the bid but he would still take a trick. The rules do not say the hand cannot still be played it just says the if the bidder is the offender than the bidder loses his bid and the offended gets 2 its. It does not say the hand must not still be played out even though there is no chance for the bidder to win the hand can still be played…correct?


ANSWER

If a renege is alleged, any team member has the right to look back at any previously played hand, he must however, wait until the hand in play is complete.
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Therefore, with it being required that the hand is played out, at some point the right would have to be played and would take a trick.


Question: I was playing a stick the dealer game. I was the dealer. Everyone passed twice so I had to make it. I was euchred and discovered that the person to my right had both bowers of the suit I had called. I asked why she didn't call it. She said it was because she had the 2 jacks but no other of the jack suits. Do you have to have at least 1 additional card of the same suit as the 2 bowers to call it?


ANSWER

No, you don't need a matching card in your hand to call. However, calling from 3rd seat with just two jacks is very risky. I agree with the decision to pass

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Thank you. 3rd seat (aka my mom) was trying to say she wasn't allowed to call it. I couldn't find an answer online so I posted to your site. I haven't played euchre in over 10 years, but I'm enjoying getting back into it. Wishing I knew the finer points, though.



If partner leads left bower, I have right and another trump, must I overtrump?


ANSWER

No, no need to. It's best to wait and use your right to take a trick latter in the hand.


Help!
When can I look at my cards or hand? I was told last-night, it was not proper for me look at my hand before the dealer had a chance to count the remaining 4 cards (insuring no misdeal). I claimed it made no difference and could look as they came to me.


ANSWER

You should be able to look at your cards anytime prior to when it's your turn to bid. Some players like to wait till the last second, and others want to see them as they are dealt Either way is fine


My partner deals the cards and turns up Queen of Clubs. The person left of her passes. I pass as well. But the player right of the dealer, "states" Diamonds. Upon realizing his error by not passing and waiting his turn to state his preferred trump, he tosses his cards into the middle of the table face up, assuming this will end this hand?? What is the rule in this situation


ANSWER

His team would get a 2 point penalty.


When dealing, and after everyone has passed, do the rules say you need to have a trump in your hand to pick up the card turned up? Then second part of the question, is the left bower considered a trump at that point. In other words , can you pick up with just the left in your hand?


ANSWER

No, there is no such rule. You may pick up or name trump even if you do not hold that suit in your hand.


I know stealing the deal is legal, but never has a good outcome in a tournament,, What about stealing points. Is it just an old wives tale or is stealing points legal, if so and you get caught, what is the penalty??


ANSWER

By stealing points I assume you mean things like marking two points when you only got one. Bumping score cards and so-on. That is called cheating, plain and simple.


My Hoyle book says, "If the maker plays alone, the opening lead is made by the opponent at his left."
This rule is disregarded by many, but I like it. Life is too easy for loners when they have a powerhouse hand AND the opening lead.


ANSWER

I have an older book of rules by Hoyle (2007). That rule is not in my book


Rather than stealing the deal only working if the first trick is played, I commonly play that it can only be called until the dealer flips up the top card. Is this a common variation? (We do the same for a misdeal)









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