The American Card Player part-8


By William Brisbane 1866, Pages 57 - 81




TWO-HANDED EUCHRE


In this, as in the four-handed game, the deal being made, the non-dealer may pass or order up; should he pass, the dealer, at his option, may pass, or discard and take up the trump, when the game begins by the lead of the non-dealer ; but should the dealer think his hand not strong enough to risk a play, he too will pass, when his adversary may pass again, or make a trump (which, as a general rule, should be next in suit) ; if he pass a second time, the dealer has the right to make a trump or again pass, in which case the cards are to be bunched, and the deal passed to the original non-dealer.


If the dealer takes up the trump and plays the hand, he must win three tricks to make a point; or should he take the five tricks, he makes a "march," which entitles him to score two points. Should he fail to make three tricks, he is Euchred and his adversary counts two points. The same rules apply to the party ordering up, or making the trump.


In passing, or ordering up, much will depend upon the state of the game, and what the player desires to accomplish; he may pass upon a good hand, when he has reason to believe that by so doing he will Euchre his adversary, should he play the hand. In this case, too, he should have good reason to suppose that his adversary will take up the trump, or else have cards to make the trump himself.


The player, remembering that he has but a single hand to contend against, may play, or even order up, if he has a reasonable hope of making three tricks.


Lead your strongest trumps first, until you have won two tricks, and then, having a trump left, lead some other card, so that, if your adversary takes it, you may have a chance to trump the card he leads, and thus make your point. Having won two tricks, and your adversary being without a trump, play for a march, by leading trumps, or your highest cards.


The deal is considered equal to a point, therefore never pass the deal unless to save a Euchre.


Having discarded, you have no right to take the card back and discard another, even though you have made a mistake. Your opponent must profit by your mistakes, as well as by your bad play, or weak hand.









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