Welcome to OhioEuchre.Com


Euchre (pronounced 'you-ker') is a classic card game that was introduced to America in the early nineteenth century. The true beginning of euchre is unknown and controversy persists among card historians that have varying theories as to the origin of the game. At one time euchre was considered the national card game in the United States. Although its overall popularity has declined, it has been kept alive by a core group of avid players. It has a prominent following in the Midwestern states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. There are also large concentrations of devotees in Canada, Great Britain and Australia.



Euchre games are generally fast moving and tend last less that twenty minutes. Although the rank of the cards may confuse new players, euchre is an easy game to learn. Games are played with four players in teams of two sitting across from one another. A partial deck of 24 cards is used and made from a standard deck with cards numbered between eight and two removed. The cards are dealt out in groups of twos and threes until each player has five cards. The remainder of the cards are laid face down and the top card is exposed. The goal of the game is to defeat your opponents by being the first team to reach 10 points. Points are made by taking at least three out of five possible tricks in a hand.



Whether you play casually among friends or seriously in the many tournaments held around the country, you will find euchre to be a fascinating and challenging game. It is also an ideal way to meet people and make new friends.



Let's learn to play euchre


It is the goal of OhioEuchre.Com to help teach new players how to play as well as help those that would like to learn more. For those that are new, may I suggest starting with our euchre lessons by




For those that have been playing a while but would like to learn new ways to improve your game may I suggest starting with our tips and info page. Here you will find a complete list of all the articles listed




Have you ever wondered how you stack up against other euchre players. This quiz was put together not only to test skill level, but as a teaching tool. Now you can see where your strength and weaknesses lay. There are total of 25 questions that range from the intermediate level to the advanced skill levels. Taking our QUIZ and is the best way to see where you stand.




Read what one of our viewers said about us


"The phrase "practice makes perfect" is a false one. To rise above mediocrity, it takes "enlightened" Practice, most often with the aid of someone or something else. Improvements take practice. A Critical attitude of what needs to be improved certainly helps, many "old-timers" tend to "practice" the same way time after time. The information is given here is a step in the right direction."

Posted by Steve on Thursday, 02.16.12 @ 21:36pm



A euchre game in progress


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8 comments so far

Good site

Posted by Trisha  on Saturday, 05.7.16 @ 16:40pm| #3612

Question: We learned Ohio version of 3-handed cutthroat this weekend. Lotsa fun. If you're down toward the end of the game, and your "partner" has 8, then should you try to lose so the caller doesn't get euchred so the game continues???? Is that part of the strategy?

Posted by Marty  on Monday, 08.22.16 @ 11:06am| #3672

I'm not really sure what you are asking. there shouldn't be a partner in cutthroat.

Posted by Don  on Monday, 08.22.16 @ 13:24pm| #3673

Hi! Was playing a game yesterday and lost because my partner threw his right instead of his 9 because he didn't want to get over-trumped. The guy in the last seat ended up following suit but then won the next hand with the left. Anyway, it got me thinking... is there a strategy for laying trump to avoid getting over-trumped but also to be able to win later hands. I did not see any articles on here specifically about that and I thought it would be interesting to hear your take on it. Personally, I always lay my lowest trump if I don't have to follow suit, unless the guy next to me is double suiting.

Posted by David  on Thursday, 11.3.16 @ 10:07am| #3701

There is a general rule of thumb that you should trump next high and trump green low.
In the hand you describe, I’m assuming that an ace was lead and this was the first lead of the suit. (As I’m sure you’re aware the second lead of a suit changes everything) Still, a couple of questions come to mind. Was this the first play of the hand? How many tricks did the other team have? Was the maker the one that had the last play? Did you partner have a singleton ace to lead after taking the trick. These things should the taken into consideration when trumping in.

Posted by Don  on Friday, 11.4.16 @ 07:22am| #3702

Hello! I was wondering if anyone knows of any euchre tournaments or leagues anywhere around canal winchester or Pickerington area I can join? I tried to Google some but all I can find are 45 min from me. THANKS!

Posted by Adam  on Wednesday, 11.9.16 @ 15:23pm| #3706

Dealer has J clubs A club 9 clubs A diamond 10 diamond and A hearts. . He calls lone hand. Does he get rid of A hearts or 10 diamond.

Posted by Rustycage  on Friday, 11.18.16 @ 22:29pm| #3711

I would discard the 10D. After first lead you will still have 2 trump and 2 aces or 3 trump and 1 ace. If you discard the aceH you may end up with 2 trump and aceD. If left,king,and a small trump are all out and in the same hand a euchre is possible. By having 2 off aces if needed you can use one to draw out their trump and still make a point. Play it safe and go for the point first. Getting euchred on a lone call is not fun.

Don

Posted by Don  on Saturday, 11.19.16 @ 17:52pm| #3714

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